Born Bad Follow up Now Available

I’m very excited to announce that Blood Ties, the follow-up to Born Bad and book two of my new trilogy, is already available to pre-order from Amazon. You can grab your copy using the link: http://viewBook.at/BloodTies. Publication date is 1st March 2018, which means that if you order now, you will have the book delivered to your Kindle as soon as that date arrives.

To give you a taster of what’s in store, here’s the fabulous cover that my publishers have designed together with the book blurb.

Adele Robinson is locked up – convicted for the murder of her abusive father. She quickly realizes that she’ll have to play it tough if she’s going to survive, and soon gains a reputation for standing her ground.

Meanwhile, her brother Peter is building his criminal empire on the outside – running protection rackets, seedy nightclubs and all manner of schemes to make a fast buck. He soon comes to the attention of, not only the police, but also Manchester’s rival gangs, and a turf war breaks out.

And when things start to get bloody, only Adele can step in to protect the family business. Will she get out in time to save Peter? After all, blood is thicker than water, and when family’s in trouble you can’t look the other way.

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I hope you’ll agree that the book blurb is very enticing. March might seem a long way off but with Christmas coming upon us, the time will soon fly by.

Big thanks to everyone who has purchased a copy of Born Bad, recommended it to others and left a review. It has surpassed all my expectations, peaking at an Amazon UK rank of 41 last week, and it continues to sell well. I hope that my readers will enjoy the second book just as much.

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Born Bad Blog Tour

I’m excited to see the start of the blog tour for Born Bad today. Here are details of the blogs that will feature excerpts from the book, reviews of Born Bad and interviews. I’ve also included the links below:

Born Bad - blog tour banner

17th July

Cheekypee Reads: Http://cheekypeereadsandreviews.blogspot.co.uk/ 

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/cheekypeereadsandreviews/ 

Twitter: @cheekypee27

18th July

Trish’s Blog: https://trishbsblog.tumblr.com/

Twitter: @TSpa2

19th July 

Love Books Group: https://lovebooksgroup.blog/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LoveBooksGrp/

Twitter: @LoveBooksGroup

20th July

Bookish Jottings: https://bookishjottings.wordpress.com/

Twitter: @BookishJottings

21st July

Emma The Little Bookworm: https://emmathelittlebookworm.wordpress.com/

Twitter: ‎@emmamitchellfpr

22nd July

The Writing Garnet: https://thewritinggarnet.wordpress.com/

Twitter: @kaishajayneh

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thewritinggarnet/

23rd July

The Book on My Desk: www.thebookonmydesk.uk

Twitter: @Sophjourns

24th July 

Kath Middleton – Books: www.kathmiddletonbooks.com.

I hope you enjoy visiting them and finding out more about the book and my inspiration behind it.

Born Bad on Sale

Born Bad is currently on sale so if you haven’t yet got your copy now is a good chance to grab it at a bargain price. Please also feel free to spread the word if you know anyone who might enjoy Born Bad. It will be featured in the following sales:

Amazon Summer Sale
The Kindle version of Born Bad is currently on offer for £1.49 in the Amazon Summer Sale, which is a 50% reduction on the normal price of £2.99. Here’s the link: Amazon: http://amzn.to/2niPMew.

Kobo Buy One get One Half Price
Born Bad has also been included in the Kobo Buy One get One Half Price sale. Here’s the link: Kobo: http://bit.ly/2o6awKj.

I’m thrilled to see Born Bad zooming up the Amazon charts. It is currently around the 400 mark in the UK, which is an excellent achievement out of all the millions of books for sale on Amazon UK. I know that I have my readers to thank for this as well as my publishers who are doing an excellent job on the promotion side of things.

If you would like to obtain a print version of Born Bad, it is also now available from Amazon at: http://amzn.to/2niPMew.

Big thanks again to everyone who has downloaded a copy of Born Bad and to those who have spread the word.

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Born Bad Launch Day

 

I’m thrilled that launch day has arrived for the first book in my gritty new crime trilogy, Born Bad, which is available from four major digital retailers. There will also be a print version available from Amazon any day now at the Amazon link below.

If you haven’t yet ordered your digital copy, here is a list of the links:

Amazon: http://amzn.to/2niPMew

Kobo: http://bit.ly/2o6awKj

Google Play: http://bit.ly/2oxtNkh

iBooks: http://apple.co/2pTSQmy

Born Bad is already selling well with more than 1400 pre-orders as at the middle of June.

Blog Tour

To celebrate the launch my publishers are organising a blog tour, which will feature excerpts, reviews and background information about my inspiration behind the characters and the setting. If you want to check out any of the blogs, here’s a list of them followed by a list of blog tour dates and the link for each blog.

17th July

Cheekypee Reads and Reviews

Http://cheekypeereadsandreviews.blogspot.co.uk/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/cheekypeereadsandreviews/

Twitter: @cheekypee27

 

18th July 

Trish’s Blog

https://trishbsblog.tumblr.com/

Twitter: @TSpa2

 

19th July

Love Books Group

https://lovebooksgroup.blog – guest post

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LoveBooksGrp/

Twitter: @LoveBooksGroup

 

20th July

Bookish Jottings

https://bookishjottings.wordpress.com – extract

Twitter: @BookishJottings

 

21st July 

Emma The Little Book Worm

https://emmathelittlebookworm.wordpress.com/book-blog – guest post

Twitter: ‎@emmamitchellfpr

 

22nd July

The Writing Garnet

https://thewritinggarnet.wordpress.com/ – Review

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thewritinggarnet/

Twitter: @kaishajayneh

 

23rd July

The Book on My Desk: www.thebookonmydesk.uk

Twitter: @Sophjourns

 

24th July 

Kath Middleton – Books: www.kathmiddletonbooks.com.

 

Lastly, I want to end with a big thank you to my publishers, Aria Fiction, for all their support to date, to my readers for continuing to buy my books and leave reviews, and to the above bloggers for kindly agreeing to take part in the blog tour.

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Domestic Violence in the UK

My latest book, Born Bad, features a character who is a victim of domestic violence. I therefore thought it would be useful to write a blog post on the subject in the hope that the information I’ve provided may help victims.

Domestic violence doesn’t just relate to women in heterosexual relationships. Men can become victims of domestic violence as can people in homosexual relationships and sometimes children can be involved too.

The Facts

  • A 2013/4 crime survey for England and Wales revealed that one in four women in England and Wales will become victims of domestic violence during their lifetime.

 

  • In 2001/2 81% of domestic violence victims were women and 19% were men.

 

  • A 2015 report revealed that one in three women worldwide experiences domestic violence from a male partner.

 

  • Reports from 2000 and 2002 show that the police received a call a minute relating to domestic violence yet only 35% of the incidents were reported to the police.

 

  • A 2011 report by the NSPCC stated that in the UK 20% of children have been exposed to domestic abuse.

Getting Help

If you are a woman suffering from domestic violence you can get lots of help and advice from Women’s Aid, including advice on legal action and housing. The website: https://www.womensaid.org.uk/  has further information on the types of help available.

Women’s Aid can also give you details of solicitors who specialise in domestic violence and, depending on your income, you may qualify for legal aid. You can find out more about legal aid from the Citizens Advice website.

Advice and information relating to domestic abuse is available to both women and men on the Citizens Advice website by following the link: advice.

Reporting Domestic Violence

Many people are afraid to report domestic violence because of potential repercussions. However, most police stations have specially trained officers who deal with domestic abuse. Often, domestic violence is a criminal offence and the person committing the offence can be arrested, cautioned or charged.

If the perpetrator is released on bail, the police will usually attach conditions to the granting of bail in order to protect the victim. You will be given a crime reference number which you will need to give to other agencies when you ask for further help.

You will also need to consider your future living arrangements but agencies such as Women’s Aid can provide advice with this. You can also find more information on reporting domestic violence on UK police service websites. Go to www.police.uk to find your local police service.

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Born Bad is the first book in a new gritty crime trilogy. It will be published on 1st July but you can pre-order your Kindle copy now by following the link: Born Bad.

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Excerpt from Born Bad

There’s now only a month to go until the launch of Born Bad.

So, as the exciting countdown begins, I thought I’d tempt you with an excerpt. Here goes:

As soon as Adele walked into the back garden of her home in the Manchester suburbs, she was horrified by the sight that met her. Among the overgrown bushes and weed-filled borders was an assortment of cracked and mossy flagstones that acted as a path. There, her ten-year-old brother, Peter, stood facing her. He was wielding a large twig which he had stripped bare. For him it now represented a whip; flexible enough to slash rapidly through the air, yet strong enough to inflict damage.

He chuckled as he repeatedly thrashed his whip onto the paving slabs in front of him. His target was several squirming caterpillars of differing sizes and various shades of green and brown, which he had lined up. Adele could see their tiny bodies writhing as savage blows from the hand-made weapon assailed them, causing their oozing entrails to spill out onto the path.

‘Stop it!’ she yelled.

Peter paused briefly to reply, ‘They’re only insects.’ He laughed and lashed the whip once more.

‘I don’t care. It’s cruel and disgusting,’ Adele shouted, becoming annoyed.

‘You’re stupid, you are. I’m not doing any harm. Go and mither someone else, Miss Goody-goody.’ His impish laughter had now disappeared, transforming his face into an unwelcoming sneer.

‘At least I’m not like you!’ said Adele.

‘What do you mean?’ he asked, staring at Adele while the caterpillars wriggled around on the paving slabs.

Adele could sense his change in tone but, despite her unease, she refused to give way. ‘You’re always up to no good, you are. You’re gonna get in trouble again if you don’t watch it.’

‘Oh shut up, you crybaby! Go and play with your dolls.’ And ignoring her pleas, he went back to meting out his vicious punishment.

Adele felt her stomach lurch at the sickening sight and cried out to him, ‘Peter, stop it; it’s horrible!’

Unfortunately, her cries soon reached the ears of their father who sped through the back door, pushing her aside. She noticed that he was still in his shabby vest, and knew that he hadn’t been out of bed long, even though it was midday. He was a menacing sight. The scruffy vest emphasised his bulky muscles, and his rugged features were set in a hard expression. She knew that he wouldn’t take kindly to having his Sunday disturbed.

‘What the bleedin’ hell’s going on here?’ he demanded.

Peter dropped the whip and looked up guiltily at his father. His jaw hung loose but he failed to utter any words of defence.

Their father didn’t need a reply, however, as his eyes took in the revolting sight. In one stride, he was on Peter, grabbing at his shirt collar and thrusting upwards until his feet left the ground.

‘You dirty little get!’ he yelled. ‘Look at the bleedin’ state of that path.’ He released his hold, allowing Peter to drop shakily to the ground. Then, prodding his forefinger into Peter’s face, he ordered, ‘Get it cleaned up… NOW!’

Peter hung his head in shame and approached the house in search of something with which to clean up the mess.

‘Where the bleedin’ hell do you think you’re going?’ roared his father. ‘I told you to clean them up.’

‘I’m going for some newspaper to wipe them up with,’ Peter replied.

‘No you’re bleedin’ not! You weren’t bothered about newspaper when you put the bleedin’ things there, so why bother now? You can get them shifted with yer hands. And I want every bit cleared up, including that slimy shit that’s come out of ’em. That’ll teach you, you dirty little bastard!’

He turned and pushed Adele aside again as he trundled back indoors. Just before stepping into the house, he turned his head back and added, ‘And you can get your bleedin’ hands washed when you’ve finished as well.’

For a few moments, Adele stood still, her eyes fixed on Peter, awaiting his reaction.

‘What you looking at, you bitch?’ he muttered. ‘It’s all your fault! If you hadn’t started carrying on, he wouldn’t have known.’ As he murmured these few words, he made a show of wiping up the slimy mess with his fingers, as though deliberately trying to antagonise her.

Adele couldn’t take any more. She ran into the house retching, and headed straight for her bedroom where she threw herself onto the bed. But the tears didn’t come. At eleven years of age, she’d suppressed her tears so often that it had become an automatic defence mechanism that helped her get through life.

Adele felt bad. She shouldn’t have carried on so much at Peter, then her father wouldn’t have known. It was bound to annoy him, especially on a Sunday. He was always in a mood on a Sunday. In fact, he was always in a mood any day, but Sundays were particularly bad. It was only recently, as she was growing up, that Adele realised why; it was because of the skinful he had had on a Saturday night. All he wanted to do on Sundays was sleep it off. Then he would sit and pore through the papers whilst their mother, Shirley, made a pretence of cleaning the house, and cooked the traditional Sunday dinner in an effort to please him.

This was usually the first attempt at cleaning that Shirley had made all week. She spent most of her days gossiping with the neighbours, sleeping or watching TV. Her evenings were spent in a similar fashion, except for the few nights a week in which she tore herself away from the street to go and play bingo.

Adele got up off the bed and drifted towards the window. She avoided the sight of Peter but looked out instead at the other houses, watching people go about their business. Allowing her mind to drift, she contemplated, for the umpteenth time, her miserable existence.

Lately she was realising that although this way of life was commonplace within these four walls, there was a different world out there. Talking to her friends had made her understand that her circumstances weren’t the norm, and other parents were different from her own. Other children went out with their families to the cinema or country parks. They had holidays at the seaside and expensive presents for their birthdays.

The only advantage she had over other children was her freedom. Her father was hardly ever home, so that gave her and Peter a chance to roam the streets and do whatever they pleased as long as news of their mischief didn’t get back to him. Their mother scarcely showed any interest in where they were going or what time they would be back.

Adele often consoled herself by imagining that one day things would be different. When she was old enough she would get a good job and a rich husband, and she would escape her domineering father and slovenly mother. She would have a beautiful home and children who would never want for anything. It was this dream that kept her going.

Just then Adele was jolted back to reality by the sound of raised voices downstairs.

‘Don’t go, Tommy, I was gonna do you a nice dinner later,’ pleaded her mother.

‘Bugger off, I’m going for a pint. There’s nowt to stay in this bloody pigsty for. I’m sick of you, you lazy cow, and those two scruffy little gets!’

This was followed by a loud slamming of the front door and Shirley muttering something to herself. Adele couldn’t quite hear her mother’s words, but she gathered that she wasn’t happy about him going out.

Adele had had enough of home for one day, so she decided that she would go outside for a while too. She was heading downstairs when she heard the sound of the door knocker. Worried it was her father coming back, she scuttled back to the top of the stairs. It was only after her mother had answered the door that Adele realised it was her grandma, Joyce.

She entered loudly and, appearing as bumptious as ever, declared, ‘I’ve just passed His Lordship in the street. He’s got a right face on him, as usual. It took him all his time to say hello. What the bleedin’ hell’s up with him this time?’ The soft features of her plump face had tightened to form an expression of scorn.

Shirley said nothing, but shook her head from side to side as she led her mother into the living room, leaving the door ajar. Adele would normally have raced down the stairs to greet her grandma, who she thought the world of. Although loud and opinionated, Joyce had a kind heart and was full of good intentions. But the look of resignation on her mother’s face, and the tired way she dragged her feet, stopped Adele from following them. She had guessed that they were about to have one of their chats, and overcome by curiosity, she crept down the stairs so she could listen in. She could just about see them both through the gap of the open door.

‘Jesus, Shirley love, what the bloody hell’s happened to this place? It looks like a bomb’s hit it and smells bloody awful! It’s worse than last time. I thought you were going to try and get on top of things!’

‘Oh don’t start, Mam. Don’t you think I’m sick of it? It’s not me that makes it a tip you know, and what’s the use of tidying it anyway when they only mess it up again?’

‘I’m worried about you, love. Every time I come you’ve let yourself go more. You’re just not happy, are you? Has he been at you again?’

‘Not really. It’s Peter he’s pissed off with, because he made a mess on the garden path, squashing some caterpillars or summat. I wish he’d leave him alone; he’s not a bad lad really.’

‘I don’t know, I worry about our Peter, always up to mischief and getting into fights. I’ve told you, he takes after his side of the family.’

Their conversation then became much quieter, and Adele had to strain to hear them. Without getting too close, and risking being caught out, she managed to catch snippets of her grandma’s words.

‘Bad lot… told you before… bad blood… mad… great-uncle… always fighting… ended up in an asylum.’

A few moments of silence followed until Shirley said, ‘I don’t know what I’m gonna do, Mam. I’ve no idea what our Peter will turn out like. I’m just glad our Adele’s all right.’

‘Aye, she’s a good girl,’ replied Joyce whose voice had returned to its normal level. ‘Keep encouraging her to do well at school so she can bugger off to university or summat. She’ll be bloody better off out of it.’ Joyce’s voice then adopted a sympathetic tone. ‘I do worry about you, Shirley love. You’ve changed so much over the years, ever since you met Tommy. You don’t seem to care anymore and you were never like this when you were younger. Did you go to the doctors like I told you to?’

‘Yeah, he’s given me these for the daytime on top of the ones I take at night,’ she said, passing something to her mother.

‘Let’s have a look,’ said Joyce who then tried to read the words on the bottle of pills. ‘Dia… ze… pam. What are they supposed to do?’

‘I don’t know,’ said Shirley. ‘But I feel more knackered than ever. I’ve not got the energy I was born with, honestly Mam.’

‘Well, I don’t know what the bloody hell to make of it all. I wish to God you’d never married him in the first place. I tried to warn you, but you wouldn’t be told. I’d take you and the kids round to my house, but I’ve just not got the room.’

‘I know that, Mam. I’ve just got to put up with it, haven’t I? Besides, I love Tommy. I just wish he wasn’t so angry all the time.’

Joyce looked exasperated, but didn’t continue. It was a topic which she had already covered many times before, so she moved onto something else. When Adele had grown tired of hearing about what Joyce’s neighbours were up to, she returned to her bedroom. There she mulled over the conversation in her young mind.

She knew her grandmother had been referring to her father and his family. She was used to her grandma Joyce talking about them, but she had never heard her mention the word ‘mad’ before. Maybe it just meant they had bad tempers. She wondered about the word asylum. It wasn’t one she was familiar with, but she decided to check it in her dictionary.

Adele took her dictionary off the row of books on the shelf. She opened it up, and scanned the words under the letter ‘a’ until she reached asylum. She found two meanings; the first of them referred to a place of refuge, but the second related to a mental institution. She wondered which of these her grandma could have been talking about but she daren’t ask.

Adele stared at the dictionary for a few moments but when the words ‘mental institution’ seemed to leap out from the page, she quickly shut it. Those words frightened her. She knew her dad had a temper, but surely that couldn’t mean he was mental. She’d heard kids at school use the words ‘mad’ and ‘mental’ when they were trying to put down someone who was a bit stupid. They weren’t nice words and she didn’t like to think of them being linked to her family.

She was curious about the tablets her mother was taking as well; something called diazepam, her grandma had said. Adele opened her dictionary again and flicked over the pages, checking whether diazepam was listed, but she couldn’t find anything.

Her thoughts flitted back to the words ‘mad’ and ‘mental’. Adele was confused. She couldn’t understand why her grandma would use such words about her family. Grandma Joyce didn’t usually say nasty things. Grandma Joyce was nice. So if she was saying bad things about her dad, then maybe they were true. Maybe he really was mad. And, if Peter took after their dad’s side of the family, did that mean he was mad too?

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I hope you enjoyed the excerpt. If it has made you want to read more, you can check out the book at Amazon by following the link: Born Bad.

I’ll be keeping you up to date soon with news of my blog tour. Until then, bye for now.

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The Power of Dreams

I often feature dreams in my books and have done so in my latest novel, Born Bad. I find that dreams can be an effective way to add drama or to convey the emotional turmoil being experienced by a certain character.

What are Dreams and why do we have them?

Nobody is really sure as to the real purpose of dreams although several theories have been put forward as to why we have them.

Sigmund Freud’s theory was that dreams are, “…disguised fulfillments of repressed wishes.” He suggested that the conscious mind does not allow us to express certain aggressive and sexual desires. These are therefore expressed through the subconscious mind in the form of dreams.

Carl Jung, on the other hand, believed that every dream has a meaning behind it and that we are all able to interpret our own dreams.

Analysing Dreams

Many theorists believe that analysing your dreams enables you to understand yourself better. There is a lot of literature on the subject, which is far too vast to cover in a blog post. However, much of the literature contains tips on how to remember your dreams, details of the common types of dreams and an interpretation of what various types of dreams mean. Here are some links if you wish to find out more on the subject:

https://psychcentral.com/lib/how-to-analyze-your-dreams-and-why-its-important/

https://psychcentral.com/lib/the-transformative-power-of-dreams/

http://www.dreamdictionary.org/dreaming/meaning-of-dreams/

http://www.dreamdictionary.org/dreaming/

Dreams in Literature

Over the centuries dreams have been used to good effect in literature. Some examples spring to mind straightaway, such as:

Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

A Midsummer Night’s Dream by Shakespeare

1984 by George Orwell

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

But, of course, there are many others that you might be familiar with. Here’s an example of my own taken from my latest book, Born Bad, which is due to launch on 1st July:

“Adele’s sleep was sporadic and strange thoughts raced around in her head. She pictured the faces of the judge and members of the jury. Then they would fade and be replaced by others; her school teacher speaking to her. ‘I want that essay handed in in six months. Six months, Adele. You’ve got six months,’ he kept repeating. And her classmates sat around her and gasped.

Then a disturbance broke her sleep. In her semi-conscious state she heard the sound of raised voices. Her heart was racing. She sat bolt upright listening for other sounds. Her father yelling. Her mother pleading. Then nothing. Still semi-conscious, she drifted back off to sleep. Back to the nightmares. Prisons. People scowling at her. And her mother in tears.”

As I get nearer to the 1st July launch date of my latest novel, Born Bad, I’ll be sharing excerpts and details of my blog tour. In the meantime, bye for now and sweet dreams.

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